Key Practices and Interventions for Training and Transitioning UR Students from an HBCU into Advanced Degree Programs in the Biomedical Sciences

  • James E. Raynor, Jr. E. Raynor, Jr. Department of Biological Sciences, Fayetteville State University, 1200 Murchison Rd, Fayetteville, NC 28301,USA
  • Juliette B. Bell B. Bell University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 21853, USA
  • Sherrice V. Allen Present Address: SVA1 Consulting, LLC, 321 Sharpsburg Rd, Fayetteville, NC 28311, USA;
  • Dawayne Whittington Strategic Evaluations, Inc., 5501 Woodberry Rd, Durham, NC 27707, USA
  • Cathy Baldwin Baldwin Department of Biological Sciences, Fayetteville State University, 1200 Murchison Rd, Fayetteville, NC 28301,USA
  • Amita Naik Department of Biological Sciences, Fayetteville State University, 1200 Murchison Rd, Fayetteville, NC 28301,USA
Keywords: NIH, diversity, underrepresented (UR) students, biomedical workforce, MBRS RISE program, evidence-based practices, research-intensive institutions and HBCU

Abstract

For more than 30 years, institutions funded by NIH had less than an impressive record for achieving diversity in the bio- medical workforce.   To address this concern, NIH recently implemented a series of bold initiatives to bridge the gaps in NIH training programs to further promote diversity. However, critical to the success of these initiatives is the timely report- ing, from institutions with large diverse populations such as HBCUs, of evidence-based practices, strategies, and interven- tions for training and transitioning individuals underrepre- sented (UR) in the biomedical sciences from baccalaureate to Ph.D. degree programs. To this end, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the 10-year success of the NIH-funded MBRS Fayetteville State University (FSU) Research Initiative for Scientific Enhancement (FSU-RISE) program for training and subsequent transitioning of UR students from the baccalaure- ate degree into advanced degree programs in the biomedical sciences. We hypothesized that the FSU-RISE program would significantly increase the number of well-prepared under- graduate UR biology and chemistry students who would graduate and transition into advanced degree programs in the biomedical sciences. This article provides evidence-based findings on practices, strategies and interventions for prepar- ing UR individuals from a Historically Black College and Uni- versity (HBCU) for successful entry into Ph.D. programs

Published
2017-06-12
Section
ARTICLES